15 February 2010

Cannon


Aimed at those dastardly French, the cannon is displayed on le rocher, near to the Palace. In the smaller photo you see a clever way of displaying cannon balls.

11 comments:

B SQUARED said...

What is it about the French that engenders almost universal ribbing?

Jilly said...

Well in this case it was me that did the ribbing and I live in France, adore France and the French - but then cannon aren't used anymore and neither is the word dastardly!

Virginia said...

Ahh yes, the French army, always on the ready to go to battle! :)

Saretta said...

Guess the balls won't roll away piled like that!

Nathalie said...

It all looks so clean and tidy - so un-war like!
Unfortunately war is an ugly affair that has very little in common with this parade display.

Nathalie said...

...glad it's all over, on this side of the world anyway!

mitch said...

The cannon balls are stacked in the traditional way of the time, here they are in a recess in the ground, but in some cases they would stack them in a large brass rack called a monkey. Since brass shrinks faster than iron as temperatures fall, if it was cold enough, the rack would become too small and the balls would crash off it making a racket. This is the origin of the term "Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey" -- no joke!

Jilly said...

How fascinating, Mitch. thanks for that info.

Leif Hagen said...

It's always good to stand BEHIND a canon - you just never know ...

Gail's Man said...

Mitch is right with his info, as I was going to tell you the same thing. Another expression is 'cannon fodder'. Used as a term for soldiers or sailors that were almost expendable during a battle. Those first in line to try and reach the target, and nearly always failing.

Steffe said...

Impressive, and some good info from mitch.

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